Freya's Cat Rescue

Dedicated to Protecting the Outsiders

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Trubby

Trubby

Our rescue kitty Trubby was born from a feral mom, in a feral cat colony. Trubby was found by me on the 4th of July, early in the day. He was all alone, meowing and meowing with no mom nearby. I know from experience that often a mom cat will leave her “kids” alone to seek food or roam around a little bit and is usually close to home. I decided to leave Trubby right there yet decided that when I returned later in the day, before fireworks, that if he was still there alone, if the mom did not return, that I would take him home. When I arrived several hours later he was still there, and scooped him up and placed him in the pet carrier. The white portion of his fur was quite dirty and there were a couple of ticks to be pulled off his tiny body. You can see in the first photo a wet Trubby after his first bath!

The 2nd photo is after he dried off. He washed up rather nicely and started to play. He followed me around the house playing with my pant legs. He was already a momma’s boy!! Plus I let him sleep in the bed and he snuggled up to my neck and fell asleep… until I rolled over. Then he walked across my back and, well accidentally fell….into the garbage pail! If a kitten could talk I know he would have said “I felt so silly and hoped she would realize I was gone. I didn’t say a word because I was in a precarious predicament, not wanting to wake her yet needing her to get me out of there! She must have realized I was MIA (missing in action) and turned on the night stand light and she looked right at me sitting in that garbage pail, helpless. She giggled and I felt soooo embarraasssedd. :-)”

As you can see, Trubby was a healthy, spunky, adorable kitten. Fast forward 6 months to the day of his neuter. When he arrived home he was never the same. He struggled to urinate immediately after the surgical procedure. I have TNR’d dozens of cats and this has never happened before. He struggles and strains then urinates only tiny portions mixed with blood. This continued on and off for several months. Finally another veterinarian suggested another surgery. It was a costly surgery called a Perineal Urethrostomy that supposedly clears blockage or scar tissue from the original surgery. Unfortunately it didn’t work in Trubby’s case. In fact, it only worsened his symptoms: blood stained urine, leakages and constant licking “down there”. I could see the physical discomfort in his face and at times, his kidney’s must have shut down because his eye whites would turn yellowish. He vomits water on a regular basis. It is upsetting that Trubby is straining to pee and then not even be aware that he was leaking droplets.

The surgical procedure alone cost approximately $850! He had to stay at the vets office overnight 3 days in a row. He was back and forth to the vet several times over two years. Follow up care included an exam, antibiotics to ward off infection on a fairly regular basis, purchasing special urinary food and having regular blood work performed due to kidney failure after the surgery.
We are in desperate need for donations to cover his hospital stay, surgery, painkillers, anesthesia, antibiotics, and blood work (over $1,100 total) then ongoing vet follow up appointments and two more stays over-night for observation. We can’t do what we do without your support!

Your tax-deductible contribution of $15.00 will help pay for veterinary expenses. If you prefer to make a smaller or larger contribution or recurring payment, click here.

Lea

Lea - Tongue Lea

Our rescue kitty Lea was born of a feral mom, in a feral cat colony. Lea was a very friendly “feral”. During feeding time she would follow me around and allow all petting. This was troublesome because cats that are too friendly may jeopardize the colony. At 9 months old, many people are of the belief that Lea is too old to socialize, having lived outside all of those 9 months. Since she is 100% black, I was concerned that, because she was so approachable, harm would come to her. During feeding, one day, I simply picked her up and carried her into the car! Within a year, we noticed that Lea wasn’t eating as much as usual and she was losing weight. She was not playing as much or as often and would not allow touch to her face. After several veterinarian visits, it was determined that Lea had inflamed gums and many infected teeth. She was so young, needed her teeth extracted, and the surgery would be very costly. We took Lea to a hospital that specializes only in cats. Surgery to remove every one of Lea’s teeth was recommended! Lea was in such pain, unable to groom herself or eat. She was vomiting daily, not digesting the food she would eat, and was drastically losing weight. Her personality completely changed and she appeared depressed.

Lea recovered from surgery within a month and gained some weight! Her sweet personality has returned and she is playing with the other cats again. The veterinarian said that her gum disease condition was likely inherited. Because all of her teeth are gone, there is nothing holding her tongue inside of her mouth. Every once in awhile her tongue sticks out just a little. Here she is with her tongue sticking out. Even though it looks cute, it is a reminder of all she has experienced in her short life.

We are in desperate need for donations to cover her hospital stay, surgery, painkillers, anesthesia, antibiotics, and blood work ($1,004.60). Lea also needed to be spayed, microchipped, and vaccinated. With your continued support she is on the road to recovery and a happy life!

Your tax-deductible contribution of $15.00 will help pay for veterinary expenses. If you prefer to make a smaller or larger contribution or recurring payment, click here.

Chunky

Chunky - Before Chunky - After

​Chunky was born into a feral cat community, living outside in the woods. ​Chunky developed such a severe eye infection during the Spring rains, that she lost sight in one of her eyes. Chunky really preferred to be an outside cat hanging out with her mom, yet her eye condition was severe requiring extensive care and was, therefore, kept indoors during her recovery. She was fortunate her eye did not require removal but she is blind in that eye. ​We are in desperate need for donations to cover her veterinary bills and blood work. Chunky also needed to be spayed, microchipped, and vaccinated.

Your tax-deductible contribution of $15.00 will help pay for veterinary expenses. If you prefer to make a smaller or larger contribution or recurring payment, click here.

 
 
 

Amber

cat_amber

Our little girl rescue kitty Amber was born of a feral mom, in a feral cat colony. She had been having such difficulty breathing after a heavy rain storm so we rescued her and her sister. Amber was always less active and as months went by and it became evident that there was something terribly wrong. She was very lethargic for an 8 month old kitten. Her labored breathing was easy to hear. She couldn’t actively play like the other cats and refrained from play participation, in a self protective mode. When she attempted to eat, she would literally gasp for air, swallowing some in the process, then become sick afterwards. After several veterinarian visits we were referred to a hospital that specializes only in cats. Exploratory surgery revealed the largest polyp the vet has ever seen. Surgery was recommended and the polyp was fortunately removed! We are in desperate need for donations to cover her hospital stay, surgery, and blood work. Amber also needed to be spayed, microchipped, and vaccinated, which we had been putting off due to her breathing problem. Since surgery, Amber has been breathing a sigh of relief! With your continued support, she will continue to thrive.

Your tax-deductible contribution of $15.00 will help pay for veterinary expenses. If you prefer to make a smaller or larger contribution or recurring payment, click here.


Donations towards sponsoring a cat or kitten may be used for food, veterinary care, supplies or other expenses at the discretion of the Board of Directors and Freya’s Cat Rescue.

Donations are tax deductible as permitted by Law.

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